Little Miss Student Teacher

www.little-miss-student-teacher.blogspot.com

1,048 notes

positivelypersistentteach:

thatssoscience:

jtotheizzoe:

Jane Goodall shares an important message on the need for empathy in science, and how viewing intelligent and social non-humans as “animal beings” can help us not only treat them with the respect they deserve, but also understand how their complex biology and behavior is intertwined with our own.  

(from NOVA’s Secret Life of Scientists)

I needed this today.

Jane Goodall came to my college while I was still an undergrad. It was one of the best educational experiences of my life.

415,140 notes

positivelypersistentteach:

defractured:

laurenjauregei:

how to be smooth as hell with your crush

im laughing so hard at the “oh. alright” 

Man, I wish I had been that smooth in college.

(Source: camliacabello97)

141 notes

nprglobalhealth:

Around The World In 8 Hospital Meals

A hospital is probably the last place a foodie traveling abroad wants to grab a bite.

After all, hospital food here in the U.S. conjures a stereotype of mystery meat and a starchy, bland side. But around the globe, there’s a lot of variety. A scan of hospital food pictures on Flickr and various blogs reveals gastronomic works of art — as well as what looks pretty close to the gruel Oliver Twist must have been fed in his workhouse. (Hat tip to Buzzfeed, which curated a collection of some of these images.)

Even within the same country, what’s served from hospital to hospital can differ wildly, according to Aatul Jain, operations manager and executive chef at Saint Clare’s Health Systems, a private hospital in New Jersey. Jain, who grew up in India, keeps track of the international hospital food scene, such as it is.

"In India — and in China — it’s the same thing. You have these [private] hospitals that are like super, five-star deluxe hotels," he says. "It beats any of the care we get over here. It beats any of the services we get over here in the Western world. "

Meanwhile, a person who isn’t wealthy might end up at a public hospital, where offerings are much more modest. So the pictures people post online, like those included in the Buzzfeed list, may not be representative of the food in a given country’s hospital system.

Here at The Salt, we reached out to some of the food photogs we came across to hear about what they were served. Responses were mixed.

Continue reading and see more photos.

Photos (top to bottom):

Malaysia: Wow! This meal even looks like it’s served on real china. Flickr user Hewyk posted this lunch from a Malaysian hospital. (hewyk/Flickr)

Qatar: "The food was excellent, I enjoyed it and rank it as good if not better than any hospital food I have had anywhere," said Flickr user Brian Candy of his meal at a hospital in Qatar. (Brian Candy/Flickr)

Japan: "Everything was well presented and delicious," Flickr user Annabelle Orozco wrote about the food she ate at an Osaka hospital. "To me it was particularly attractive for hospital food." (Annabelle Orozco/Flickr)

Austria: "I think I actually got depressed from how bad it was," Flickr user girl_onthe_les said about this hospital lunch served up in Austria in 2012. Us too. (girl_onthe_les/Flickr)

(via msformel)

16,422 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

skunkbear:

These are the disease outbreaks that could have been prevented by proper vaccination according to the Council on Foreign Relations. You can explore the interactive map here.

Check out the thousands of whooping cough cases in the United States in 2011 and the measles outbreaks plaguing Europe.

Would also be interested to see the speed of decline in rotavirus, meningitis, and pneumonia deaths in south Asia and subsaharan Africa due to vaccines for those diseases.

(via incrdiblethngs)

278,300 notes

doctor-in-a-policebox:

warpsbyherself:

gallouvich:

justemoiici:

clannyphantom:

icarly-official:

backdoorteenmom:

Don’t be surprised when they bring a gun to school

that’s not even complicated you literally add 26 and 19 then simplify 2025 over 45 to be 45/1 then multiply 24 and 45 making it 1080 then add 1080 and 47 and unlock the iPad with the passcode 1-1-2-7 god bless

looks like we found ourselves a nerd

looks like we found someone capable of basic math

how is that basic math

this is basic math

 

doctor-in-a-policebox:

warpsbyherself:

gallouvich:

justemoiici:

clannyphantom:

icarly-official:

backdoorteenmom:

Don’t be surprised when they bring a gun to school

that’s not even complicated you literally add 26 and 19 then simplify 2025 over 45 to be 45/1 then multiply 24 and 45 making it 1080 then add 1080 and 47 and unlock the iPad with the passcode 1-1-2-7 god bless

looks like we found ourselves a nerd

looks like we found someone capable of basic math

how is that basic math

this is basic math


 

(via hermioneeowynp)

290,193 notes

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

(via from-student-to-teacher)

7,583 notes

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

dinocology:

astrodidact:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech

A high school student from India has invented a device that can convert a person’s breath into speech, to give millions of people around the world suffering from speech impediment a ‘voice’ for the first time.

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis.

http://www.sciencealert.com.au/news/20141509-26176.html

His name is Arsh Shah Dilbagi and he’s 16 years old. Gettin tired of sensationalized “mystery baby from a country where people are brown does a science thing!” articles. Use peoples names, don’t act so surprised when people of color are geniuses.

This is brilliant!

(Source: jessehimself, via msformel)

276,208 notes

sometimes i wonder what my teachers’ otps are.

what if teachers shipped their students

ship wars in the staff room

anonymous hate mail in other teachers’ assignment boxes

fanfiction written by english teachers, fanart drawn by art teachers

the real edgy teachers write teacher/student fics and hope the school board doesn’t find out

(the school board knows and eagerly awaits each new chapter)

#all of those rogue seating arrangements suddenly make sense

(via collybolly)